Resurfaced: Austin Powers in Goldmember (2002)

In this series of articles, I’ll be posting reviews that have recently resurfaced. A number of the reviews I wrote in the past I thought had been lost to time, but after coming to a realization that they might still exist on the Wayback Machine, I was able to relocate many of them. I believe there are still some that are lost and they may be lost in perpetuity, but I will periodically search for that data or re-write those reviews that I have never found or which I never wrote to begin with.

For now, this series will be extensive with over 300 regular (400+ words), short (400- words), and quickie (1 to 2 paragraphs) reviews. I will attempt to combine them as best as I can. Reviews written in early 1998 or earlier, no date of creation exists. I will post the original writing date where known, otherwise the date will be listed as “unknown.” These reviews were written between the date of my site’s founding in 1996 through much of 2002. It was only after this period that I settled on the standard format and length of reviews as well as posting each one to its own individual page, which is why the old data was ultimately lost.

All but the review content has been replaced to match my current formatting guidelines, which are a bit more thorough than they might have been in those early days. Please note that I am attempting to retain as much of the original editing integrity as possible, so spelling and/or grammar errors may still be present. This may also mean that some factual data is not there as IMDb was not as ubiquitous as it is now. So, let’s get on to today’s review.

Austin Powers in Goldmember

Austin Powers in Goldmember

Rating

Director

Jay Roach

Screenplay

Mike Myers, Michael McCullers

Length

1h 34m

Starring

Mike Meyers, Beyoncé Knowles, Seth Green, Michael York, Robert Wagner, Mindy Sterling, Verne Troyer, Michael Caine, Fred Savage, Diane Mizota, Carrie Ann Inaba, Nobu Matsuhisa, Aaron Himelstein, Josh Zuckerman, Eddie Adams, Evan Farmer

MPAA Rating

PG-13
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This Day in Oscar History: August 12 (2022)

Here’s what happened today in Oscar History.

Born

Died

Released


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Poll: Remaking Best Directing, 2014

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Polls

Remaking Best Directing, 2014

In our fifteenth and final pass of the Oscar nominees from 1997 through 2016, we take a look at the nominees for Best Directing. Each week, we’ll present a list of contenders from which you can select five to make up the Best Directing slate. There will be an “Other” option, but you can only use this once and you’ll have to specify your other in the comments. Now on to the game: Best Directing.

Cinema Sight Asks: Which Hopefuls Should Have Been Nominated for Best Directing (select up to 5)?

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Film Preview: Breaking (2022)

Film Poster

Page Revisions:

(August 7, 2022) Original

Release Date:

August 26, 2022

Synopsis:

From IMDb: “A Marine war veteran faces mental and emotional challenges when he tries to reintegrate back into civilian life.”

Poster Rating: C

SEE ALL POSTERS BELOW
Review: The attempt to add some details in the background works modestly welling, but their blend makes them hard to see and the background is still uninteresting.

Trailer Rating: C+

SEE ALL TRAILERS BELOW
Review: The look and feel of the film feels very much like Dog Day Afternoon, a connection related early in the trailer. Unfortunately, the reasons are poorly advanced and the audience only gets superficial bits of information about the film’s purpose without understanding what the resolution is intended to be.

Oscar Prospects:

None.

Trailer #1

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5 Favorites #141: Unsung Horror of the 21st Century

Welcome to 5 Favorites. Each week, I will put together a list of my 5 favorites (films, performances, whatever strikes my fancy) along with commentary on a given topic each week, usually in relation to a specific film releasing that week.

Initially, I wanted to make this week’s article about my favorite horror films of the 21st Century so far. With Fall releasing this weekend and Bodies Bodies Bodies expanding wide, I felt it was the perfect time to tackle such a list. Then I put it together. Sixteen titles made the list and that’s a lot to narrow down to five. Rather than isolate it down to the same five I’ve talked about a lot in the past, I decided to pick five films that are seldom cited on such lists or which have been somewhat forgotten for myriad reasons. For the record, the eleven films that didn’t make the cut were: The Others (2001), Berberian Sound Studio (2013), 10 Cloverfield Lane (2016), Get Out (2017), Shaun of the Dead (2004), Zombieland (2009), The Purge (2013), The Purge: Anarchy (2014), The Purge: Election Year (2016), Suspiria (2018), and Hereditary (2018). Now for this week’s five.

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Oscar Profile #611: Bruce Dern

Born June 4, 1936 in Chicago, Illinois into a prominent American family, Bruce Dern’s mother was the niece of poet Archibald MacLeish and his father was the son of former Utah Governor and sitting Secretary of War under Franklin Delano Roosevelt, George Dern. His godfather was future Presidential candidate Adlai Stevenson.

A lifelong avid runner and track star in high school, Dern tried out for the Olympic Trials in 1956. Studying at the Actors Studio under Elia Kazan and Lee Strasberg, he made his Broadway debut in 1958 in Sweet Bird of Youth in support of Paul Newman and Geraldine Page. He made his film debut in 1960 in Wild River in support of Montgomery Clift and Lee Remick, gaining prominence as Bette Davis’ murdered lover in 1964’s Hush…Hush, Sweet Charlotte.

Married to Marie Dawn Pierce in 1957, they divorced in 1959. Dern married actress Diane Ladd in 1960, the mother of his daughter, actress Laura Dern. He and Dern were divorced in 1969, the year he married third wife Andrea Beckett with whom he has been married ever since.

Dern’s career took off in a big way with his strong supporting roles as a marathon runner in 1969’s They Shoot Horses, Don’t They? and as the cattle thief who kills John Wayne in 1970’s The Cowboys. In 1972, he costarred with Jack Nicholson in The King of Marvin Gardens and in 1974 he co-starred with Robert Redford and Mia Farrow in The Great Gatsby for which he was nominated for a Golden Globe. In 1975 he starred in the hit comedy, Smile, and in 1976 he was one of four stars of Alfred Hitchcock’s last film, Family Plot.

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Resurfaced: Lantana (2001)

In this series of articles, I’ll be posting reviews that have recently resurfaced. A number of the reviews I wrote in the past I thought had been lost to time, but after coming to a realization that they might still exist on the Wayback Machine, I was able to relocate many of them. I believe there are still some that are lost and they may be lost in perpetuity, but I will periodically search for that data or re-write those reviews that I have never found or which I never wrote to begin with.

For now, this series will be extensive with over 300 regular (400+ words), short (400- words), and quickie (1 to 2 paragraphs) reviews. I will attempt to combine them as best as I can. Reviews written in early 1998 or earlier, no date of creation exists. I will post the original writing date where known, otherwise the date will be listed as “unknown.” These reviews were written between the date of my site’s founding in 1996 through much of 2002. It was only after this period that I settled on the standard format and length of reviews as well as posting each one to its own individual page, which is why the old data was ultimately lost.

All but the review content has been replaced to match my current formatting guidelines, which are a bit more thorough than they might have been in those early days. Please note that I am attempting to retain as much of the original editing integrity as possible, so spelling and/or grammar errors may still be present. This may also mean that some factual data is not there as IMDb was not as ubiquitous as it is now. So, let’s get on to today’s review.

Lantana

Lantana

Rating

Director

Ray Lawrence

Screenplay

Andrew Bovell (Play: Andrew Bovell)

Length

2h 01m

Starring

Anthony LaPaglia, Geoffrey Rush, Barbara Hershey, Kerry Armstrong, Rachael Blake, Vince Colosimo, Russell Dykstra, Daniella Farinacci, Peter Phelps, Leah Purcell, Glenn Robbins

MPAA Rating

R
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This Day in Oscar History: August 11 (2022)

Here’s what happened today in Oscar History.

Born

Died

Released


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Poll: What Are You Watching? (Aug. 12-14, 2022)

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Polls

What Are You Watching? (Aug. 12-14, 2022)

Cinema Sight Asks: What are you watching? (Aug. 12-14, 2022)

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Film Preview: Samaritan (2022)

Film Poster

Page Revisions:

(August 7, 2022) Original

Release Date:

August 26, 2022

Synopsis:

From IMDb: “A young boy learns that a superhero who was thought to have gone missing after an epic battle twenty years ago may in fact still be around.”

Poster Rating: B- / C

SEE ALL POSTERS BELOW
Review: (#1) Although the design is a bit obvious and the background details are uninspired, it effectively gets the film’s concept out there for audiences to build intrigue. (#2) A simple, yet more obvious take on the prior design that is almost too simplistic as to be confusing.

Trailer Rating: C+

SEE ALL TRAILERS BELOW
Review: We’ve seen numerous films about aged hitmen trying to get out of the game, but we haven’t seen very many films about superheroes trying to get out of it. That gives the concept a fresh feeling, but the trailer doesn’t keep that newness engaged and ultimately feels like something we’ve seen countless times before even if unique.

Oscar Prospects:

None.

Trailer #1

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2022 Spring Season Box Office Wrap-Up: March

Below is a wrap-up of the predictions I made several months ago, an exploration of what succeeded and what failed, and how I observe things to have gone.

March 4, 2022

The Batman

Oscar Prospects: What I said: “None.”
Oscar Results: Still None
Box Office Prospects: $200 M
Box Office Expectations: What I Said: “Good. It’s hard to say how Warner Bros. will do now that they’ve stopped forcing day-and-date on their features. This should be an interesting test, though it’s fascianting how few wide release are coming out in the typically more lively March.”
Box Office Results: $369.5 M
Thoughts: [Major Success] The DC character that is most likely to win at the box office is Batman even though Superman also does well. It’s no surprise the film was a success, but this is a huge tally for a March release.

March 25, 2022

The Lost City

Oscar Prospects: What I said: “None.”
Oscar Results: Still None
Box Office Prospects: $100 M
Box Office Expectations: What I Said: “Good. Give audiences a good action-adventure romance film and they’ll show up. The question is will this be good enough to summon people to the box office.”
Box Office Results: $105.3 M
Thoughts: [Minor Success] A more expected tally for a March release, the $105 million box office pull for an original comedy is solid even if it’s just barely so.

Looking at the Weekend: Aug. 12-14, 2022

This weekend will have a few questions associated with it. 1) Can Bullet Train avoid a huge second weekend plunge and will that be enough to overcome a weak set of new releases? 2) Will Diane Keaton still be able to open a geriatric comedy at the top of the box office in spite of such a hackneyed premise? 3) Will the wide expansion of horror film Bodies Bodies Bodies be able to ride solid reviews to a number one finish? It’s hard to say what answers we’ll get as it’s just as possible that the opposite answers are true, but I suspect the answers are 1) Bullet Train will get a solid second-week hold, but it won’t be enough to top the box office. 2) Keaton is not going to have a good weekend as her film fails to appeal to the youth demographic, but it will still have modest support from Keaton fans and seniors. 3) The originality of the Bodies Bodies Bodies idea should be enough to boost it to the number one finish in a tight competition with Bullet Train.

Our Highest Rated Films: Summering
Our Best Awards Ratings: None

OTHER LIMITED RELEASES

Bodies Bodies Bodies (Expands Wide) (Covered Previous, Click Here)
Bloom Up: A Swinger Couple Story (Limited)
Emergency Declaration (Limited)
Free Chol Soo Lee (Limited)
Free Puppies! (Limited)
Girl Picture (Limited)
El Gran Movimiento (Limited)
Inu-Oh (Limited)
Laal Singh Chaddha (Limited)
No Way Out (Limited)
Rogue Agent (Limited)

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Review: Suspiria (1977)

Suspiria

Suspiria

Rating

Director

Dario Argento

Screenplay

Dario Argento, Daria Nicolodi (Book: Thomas De Quincey)

Length

1h 39m

Starring

Jessica Harper, Stefania Casini, Flavio Bucci, Miguel Bose, Barbara Magnolfi, Susanna Javicoli, Eva Axen, Rudolf Schundler, Udo Kier, Alida Valli, Joan Bennett

MPAA Rating

R
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Resurfaced: Melody Time (1948)

In this series of articles, I’ll be posting reviews that have recently resurfaced. A number of the reviews I wrote in the past I thought had been lost to time, but after coming to a realization that they might still exist on the Wayback Machine, I was able to relocate many of them. I believe there are still some that are lost and they may be lost in perpetuity, but I will periodically search for that data or re-write those reviews that I have never found or which I never wrote to begin with.

For now, this series will be extensive with over 300 regular (400+ words), short (400- words), and quickie (1 to 2 paragraphs) reviews. I will attempt to combine them as best as I can. Reviews written in early 1998 or earlier, no date of creation exists. I will post the original writing date where known, otherwise the date will be listed as “unknown.” These reviews were written between the date of my site’s founding in 1996 through much of 2002. It was only after this period that I settled on the standard format and length of reviews as well as posting each one to its own individual page, which is why the old data was ultimately lost.

All but the review content has been replaced to match my current formatting guidelines, which are a bit more thorough than they might have been in those early days. Please note that I am attempting to retain as much of the original editing integrity as possible, so spelling and/or grammar errors may still be present. This may also mean that some factual data is not there as IMDb was not as ubiquitous as it is now. So, let’s get on to today’s review.

Melody Time

Melody Time

Rating

Director

Clyde Geronimi, Wilfred Jackson, Jack Kinney, Hamilton Luske

Screenplay

Winston Hibler, Erdman Penner, Harry Reeves, Homer Brightman, Ken Anderson, Ted Sears, Joe Rinaldi, Bill Cottrell, Art Scott, Jesse Marsh, Bob Moore, John Walbridge

Length

1h 15m

Starring

Roy Rogers, Trigger, Dennis Day, The Andrews Sisters, Fred Waring and His Pennsylvanians, Freddy Martin, Ethel Smith, Frances Langford, Buddy Clark, Bob Nolan, Sons of the Pioneers, The Dinning Sisters, Bobby Driscoll, Luana Patten

MPAA Rating

Approved
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This Day in Oscar History: August 10 (2022)

Here’s what happened today in Oscar History.

Born

Died

Released


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