Film Preview: Cherry (2021)

Film Poster

Page Revisions:

(January 17, 2021) Original
(January 24, 2021) New Trailer (#2) — New Poster (#7)

Release Date:

February 26, 2021

Synopsis:

From IMDb: “An Army medic suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder becomes a serial bank robber after an addiction to drugs puts him in debt.”

Poster Rating: C (6) / C

SEE ALL POSTERS BELOW
Review: (#1-#6) This sextet of designs uses the cherry red coloring to feel edgy, but they are all rather uninteresting taken separately and together.

(#7) More of the same is not always better, especially when the prior designs were so lifeless.

Trailer Rating: C- / C

SEE ALL TRAILERS BELOW
Review: (#1) Teasing the audience without any narrative tension or creative energy makes it difficult to approach a film like this with much anticipation. Trailers should most certainly do better at that than this one does.

(#2) Is this film intended to be some kind of time-twisting narrative with a clairvoyant at the lead or just a film about some supposed-to-be lovable schmuck trying to find a way to survive and find love in the world? Either film isn’t well presented or very convincing with this trailer.

Oscar Prospects:

Tom Holland hasn’t been in the Oscar conversation since The Impossible, but there is some building around this film. It’s supposed to release just before the Oscar deadline, but it’s entering the race far too late to be a capable player.

Trailer #1

Click here to continue reading this article

Weekend Preview: Jan. 29-31, 2021

Below are four previews for films opening next weekend.

 

The Little Things (Wide)

Cinema Sight Preview
 
 
 

Haymaker (Limited)

Cinema Sight Preview
 
 
 

The Night (Limited)

Cinema Sight Preview
 
 
 

Supernova (Limited)

Cinema Sight Preview
 
 

Film Preview: Haymaker (2021)

Film Poster

Page Revisions:

(January 24, 2021) Original

Release Date:

January 29, 2021

Synopsis:

From IMDb: “Haymaker follows a retired Muay Thai fighter (Sasso) working as a bouncer, who rescues an alluring transgender performer (Ruiz) from a nefarious thug, eventually becoming her bodyguard, protector, and confidant. The relationship leads Sasso’s character to make an unexpected return to fighting, risking not only his relationship, but his life. Its a story about human dignity and love.”

Poster Rating: –

SEE ALL POSTERS BELOW
Review: There was no poster immediately available for my review. Should one become available in the future, this section will be updated.

Trailer Rating: C

SEE ALL TRAILERS BELOW
Review: The synopsis explores a more complex film than the trailer does and that’s not a good selling point. The preview looks like a strange boxing-style movie that is supposed to contain a redemptive storyline, but feels like an unenticing effort about acceptance, tolerance, and perhaps love.

Oscar Prospects:

None.

Trailer #1

Click here to continue reading this article

This Day in Oscar History: January 24 (2021)

Here’s what happened today in Oscar History.

Born

Died

Released

Oscar Nominations

Click here to continue reading this article

Film Preview: Nobody (2021)

Film Poster

Page Revisions:

(January 17, 2021) Original

Release Date:

February 26, 2021

Synopsis:

From IMDb: “A bystander who intervenes to help a woman being harassed by a group of men becomes the target of a vengeful drug lord.”

Poster Rating: C

SEE ALL POSTERS BELOW
Review: A lot of poster designs don’t seem to try very hard to look realistic. This one almost succeeds. The fist to the face and the fist grasping shirt collar being real and the rest fake almost works.

Trailer Rating: C

SEE ALL TRAILERS BELOW
Review: The reference to John Wick seems both appropriate and a disappointment. Every actor of a certain age looking to make such a film should watch this trailer and realize why it might not work to their advantage.

Oscar Prospects:

None.

Trailer #1

Click here to continue reading this article

This Day in Oscar History: January 23 (2021)

Here’s what happened today in Oscar History.

Born

Died

Released

Oscar Nominations

Click here to continue reading this article

Film Preview: The United States vs. Billie Holiday (2021)

Film Poster

Page Revisions:

(January 17, 2021) Original

Release Date:

February 26, 2021

Synopsis:

From IMDb: “Follows Holiday during her career as she is targeted by the Federal Department of Narcotics with an undercover sting operation led by black Federal Agent Jimmy Fletcher, with whom she had a tumultuous affair.”

Poster Rating: C

SEE ALL POSTERS BELOW
Review: This definitely looks like a poster designer just tossed everything together in five minutes and called it a day, making for a simplistic and clumsy execution.

Trailer Rating: C+

SEE ALL TRAILERS BELOW
Review: I’m sure there’s an interesting story here that needs to be expressed, but the trailer doesn’t quite do it justice. Building on tropes and situations we’ve seen far too many times before, the film doesn’t quite look like the success one would hope it could be.

Oscar Prospects:

Andra Day could be a Best Actress contender, but the film is said not to work terribly well, so it might collapse and so might Day’s chances.

Trailer #1

Click here to continue reading this article

Oscar in Box Office History (Week 4, 2021)

Every week, we’ll take a look back in 5-year intervals at the box office past to explore how Oscar’s nominees were doing at the box office each weekend historically. The first section under each year is the positioning of all Oscar nominees during that weekend at the box office (as well as a section looking at the inflation-adjusted numbers). The third section is an alphabetical list of those films and the categories in which they were nominated. And to start each week off, we’ll be looking at the films releasing over the weekend that have the best chance of getting Oscar nominations and specifying the categories where we think they have the best shots at this stage of the game. If you have any suggestions for more data you’d like to see, please let us know.

This Year: Potential Oscar Nominees Releasing This Weekend

None

Click here to continue reading this article

The Friday Face-Off, Round Three #7

Below are our face-offs for this week. Choose the better winner in each category. For more information on how the game works, click here.

Click here to continue reading this article

This Day in Oscar History: January 22 (2021)

Here’s what happened today in Oscar History.

Born

Died

Released

Oscar Nominations

Our Site Milestones

2010: The Oscar Guy Became Cinema Sight (11)

Click here to continue reading this article

Poll: Remaking Best Original Screenplay, 2009

Return Links

Polls

Remaking Best Original Screenplay, 2009

In our eleventh pass of the Oscar nominees from 1997 through 2016, we take a look at the nominees for Best Original Screenplay. Each week, we’ll present a list of contenders from which you can select five to make up the Best Original Screenplay slate. There will be an “Other” option, but you can only use this once and you’ll have to specify your other in the comments. Now on to the game: Best Original Screenplay.

Cinema Sight Asks: Which Hopefuls Should Have Been Nominated for Best Original Screenplay (select up to 5)?

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...

Film Preview: Malcolm & Marie (2021)

Film Poster

Page Revisions:

(January 17, 2021) Original

Release Date:

February 5, 2021

Synopsis:

From IMDb: “A director and his girlfriend’s relationship is tested after they return home from his movie premiere and await critics’ responses.”

Poster Rating: C

SEE ALL POSTERS BELOW
Review: The black-and-white motif of the film is transitioned into the poster design, but it doesn’t quite do the image or titling justice.

Trailer Rating: C+

SEE ALL TRAILERS BELOW
Review: While the perfects certainly look expressive, this trailer doesn’t quite do them justice. The filmmakers obviously want us to experience a story of love in a new way, but this preview does little to make it seem that appealing.

Oscar Prospects:

This is another late-breaking Oscar contender with performances from John David Washington and Zendaya that are earning some early buzz. That doesn’t mean it will reach Oscar voters in time, but who knows.

Trailer #1

Click here to continue reading this article

5 Favorites Redux #64: Favorite Political Films

Welcome to 5 Favorites. Each week, I will put together a list of my 5 favorites (films, performances, whatever strikes my fancy) along with commentary on a given topic each week, usually in relation to a specific film releasing that week.

It’s been a busy week and with my other obligations taking up a lot of extra time, I found myself struggling to come up with a topic for this week. My original idea for this list was to populate it with Oscar-nominated films released in January. However, the more I dug into the list, the more flaws and inconsistencies I found. Unfortunately, release date information is less bountiful in decades past, so some of the films I had put on my list were showing dates contrary to my original research. As such, I had to abandon the list because of the absolute nightmare it would be to verify the release windows of over 100 films.

Next, I thought about shifting that focus to Oscar nominees born in January. However, with 351 names on the list, narrowing down to 5 was an impossible task. So, that left me with only one idea…

On January 20, 2021, Joseph R. Biden took office as the 46th President of the United States of America. On this historic occasion, and the sheer joy the end of a four-year experiment in ego and selfishness has brought, I thought I would look at my favorite films about the political process. Politics have been a common theme for filmmakers since the early days of cinema, most notably biopics. Abraham Lincoln himself has been portrayed on the big screen numerous times with the earliest being a 1908 moving picture called The Reprieve: An Episode in the Life of Abraham Lincoln. Walter Huston, Henry Fonda, Raymond Massey, F. Murray Abraham, and Daniel Day-Lewis are but a handful of the names of those who’ve portrayed him.

With the momentous events of yesterday being felt for some time, my five favorite political films have also been a defining part of our cultural heritage. Of course, there will be films left off the list. All the President’s Men is all about the scandal surrounding the break-in at the Watergate Hotel, but follows the newspapermen who exposed it rather than the political act itself. The same is true of films like JFK, The Post, and myriad others.

I also eliminated films dealing with politics in other nations such as The Queen, In the Loop, and Gandhi. Narrowing to just five was still very difficult and a lot of great movies got left by the wayside. I also decided not to go with obvious choices like Citizen Kane, Lincoln, or Mr. Smith Goes to Washington.

What is most interesting about my final five is that all of these films were released in 1962 or 1964. Maybe there’s a simple reason for why that decade was one of the best for films about politics or perhaps it’s because it happened to be a politically tumultuous period made all the more alarming by the 1963 assassination of John Fitzgerald Kennedy. Whatever the reason, I’d like to highlight the three films I almost included before digging into the ones I finally decided on.

Two of the three films were about Richard Millhouse Nixon, the disgraced former president who resigned his office out of fear that he would be impeached and removed from office by congress. There are many factors of that particular event that bear some striking resemblance to the presidency that is just expiring, but it’s best not to dwell on that for now. The two films were very different. Nixon was one of the last great films Oliver Stone ever directed with superb performances from Anthony Hopkins as Nixon, Joan Allen as his beleaguered wife Pat (who should have won an Oscar for her performance), and Paul Sorvino as Henry Kissinger (who should have at least been nominated). The other is Frost/Nixon, one of Ron Howard’s absolute best films with Frank Langella in a towering and unparalleled performance as Nixon as he’s interviewed by celebrated British interviewer David Frost, a near-equal performance by Michael Sheen. If I had to choose between these two, Howard’s film would probably win because it was more riveting while being little more than a two-man conversation.

The other film I nearly placed on this list was Gus Van Sant’s brilliant narrative drama about the rise to prominence of gay icon Harvey Milk, a pioneer in California politics, who was the first openly gay man elected to a political office. It also details his later assassination. Sean Penn is terrific, but Josh Brolin and Diego Luna steal the show.

With all of that said, here are my five favorites, a combination of traditional dramas, thrillers, and a palate cleanser of a satire.

Click here to continue reading this article

Oscar Profile #532: Bruce Davison

Born June 28, 1946 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to Clair and Marian Davison, Bruce Davison is a graduate of Pennsylvania State University and New York University. He made his Broadway debut in Tiger at the Gates, his film debut in 1969’s Last Summer, and his TV debut in a 1970 episode of Medical Center.

Following the success of Last Summer, Davison was given the leads in 1970’s The Strawberry Statement and 1971’s Willard, alternating with further TV appearances. In 1972, he co-starred with Burt Lancaster in Ulzana’s Raid, the same year he married first wife, Jess Walton, a marriage that was annulled in 1976.

Davison remained busy with TV work, but his next big screen role was a supporting one as the grown Patrick Dennis in 1974’s Mame, followed by more TV work. His next lead role in a film was in 1976’s Short Eyes. He was part of the ensemble in the 1977 TV Christmas classic, The Gathering. He had lead roles in two fondly remembered 1978 TV films, Dead Man’s Curve and Summer of My German Soldier. In 1979, he was in The Gathering II. In 1980, he took over the role of John Merrick in Broadway’s The Elephant Man and in 1981 he was top billed in a still highly regarded TV mini-series of Mourning Becomes Electra. In 1983, he played Jessica Tandy’s son in a Broadway revival of The Glass Menagerie. In 1986, he married second wife Lisa Pelican with whom he had a son in 1996.

Click here to continue reading this article

This Day in Oscar History: January 21 (2021)

Here’s what happened today in Oscar History.

Born

Died

Released

Click here to continue reading this article