Category: Morning After

The Morning After: Nov. 12, 2019

Welcome to The Morning After, where I share with you what movies I’ve seen over the past week. Below, you will find short reviews of those movies along with a star rating. Full length reviews may come at a later date.

So, here is what I watched this past week:

Us


Jordan Peele’s sophomore outing proves that Get Out was no fluke. Us is a thrilling, gripping horror film that understands its predecessors and uses them to good effect.

Oscar winner Lupita Nyong’o stars as a woman with a fear of the beach. After an incident that happened to her at a young age, she took years to emerge from her silence and now has a loving husband and two wonderful children. The film opens at a carnival where 8-year-old Adelaide gets lost in a fun house mirror maze where she comes face-to-face with her doppelganger. When her doppleganger and those of her family show up at the family’s vacation house, it becomes a fight for her life and for the lives her family as the mysteries surrounding the dopplegangers slowly reveal themselves to the audience.

Peele’s freshman effort, Get Out, was a superb achievement, but Us demonstrates his ability to evoke complex emotions from the audience, weave a fascinating narrative, and call back to horror history in an effort to inform and terrify modern audiences. Nyong’o delivers a stellar performance as Adelaide and her doppleganger Red while the rest of the cast acquits itself nicely for the material.

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The Morning After: November 4, 2019

Welcome to The Morning After, where I share with you what movies I’ve seen over the past week. Below, you will find short reviews of those movies along with a star rating. Full length reviews may come at a later date.

So, here is what I watched this past week:

The Lighthouse

For once, I’m not issuing a rating of a film within my short review of it. The Lighthouse is one of those films that defies easy and initial review. One can look at it analytically and find a lot of great features, but then the plot throws everything out of sync and makes you wonder not only what you saw, but whether or not it was any good.

Let’s start with the good. Jarin Blaschke’s cinematography is crisp and haunting. The use of light and shadow plays well into the film’s concept and returning to a very old aspect ratio puts us squarely in the past even if it limits the amount of space the director has to work with, though I’m sure that was his own decision. Craig Lathrop’s production design is also terrific, creating a place and setting of creepy realism. The performances of stars Robert Pattinson and Willem Dafoe are mesmerizing, taking the audience from veiled hostility to crazed conflict over the course of the film. We knew Dafoe had that kind of power, but Pattinson keeps trying to prove he’s more than the vampire kid and if this doesn’t put that notion to bed, then he will never outlive that reputation.

Then there’s the bad. Eggars, along with his brother Max, have crafted a screenplay that defies explanation. As a thought exercise, that’s exciting, but from a cinematic experience it’s utterly aggravating. Trying to understand a film and its nuances along with hits emotional and philosophical stances can be challenging, but it shouldn’t defy understanding entirely. The pacing is slow at times and doesn’t entirely make sense. While there are elements of the film that suggest this is a chance for both character to explore their past indelicacies, those flaws don’t evoke themselves terribly well. Perhaps guilt has a major impact on the proceedings, but is there some other premise at work here. Could the two be trapped in purgatory, ferried to the island of the damned, unable to leave and slowly driven mad by their fallibility? The closing scene would support that concept, looking like a painting from a Renaissance master. There are questions still to be answered, and over time, I may better understand them, but it’s this confusion combined with the frequent tedium of the film itself that inhibits my ability to reach an immediate and informed conclusion, even four days after seeing the film itself.

The Morning After: Sep. 9, 2019

Welcome to The Morning After, where I share with you what movies I’ve seen over the past week. Below, you will find short reviews of those movies along with a star rating. Full length reviews may come at a later date.

So, here is what I watched this past week:

Toy Story 4


A film series that gets to go out on a high note is a rare thing. Just look at the Jurassic Park films, X-Men, Terminator, Alien, and myriad others. Toy Story 4 may not be the best film in the series, a distinction still held by Toy Story 2 followed closely by Toy Story 3, but it’s an incredible improvement over the original and filled with the kind of series-ending situations that make poignant sense.

With Toy Story creator and series mainstay John Lasseter drummed out of Pixar for his sexual harassment, there hasn’t been anyone to shepherd the film through the creative process like he could. Toy Story 3 had been directed by Pixar titan Lee Unkrich, but this final film was helmed by Inside Out co-writer Josh Cooley, a figure who had yet to direct any of Disney’s big screen efforts, longform or short. Cooley shows the greenness of a low-level animator who understands the concepts of animation, but hasn’t had sufficient experience to execute them. The strength of the story outweighs Cooley’s inexperience behind the camera, which helps the film succeed far more than it might have otherwise.

The terrific voice cast has returned with the notable exception of Don Rickles, who died two years earlier, but whose voice remains a part of the film, having been cobbled together from archival footage. Tom Hanks as our stalwart central figure Woody continues to deliver the best vocal work of the series, though without being surrounded by the talented efforts of returning Annie Potts (Bo Peep), and new contributors Tony Hale as Forky, Keegan-Michael Key and Jordan Peele as Ducky and Bunny, and Christina Hendricks as Gabby Gabby, wouldn’t have succeeded nearly as easily.

This is an animated film from a studio that has become accustomed to churning out high quality productions form imaginative minds that embed themselves in our psyches, Even when the central figures aren’t facing insurmountable odds, the waterworks still flow at the simple elegance of certain sequences. Toy Story 4 and the series that precedes it represent the best that Pixar has to offer. While a subtle downturn of quality from the excellence of its immediate predecessor looms over the entire film, there’s little question that the worthwhile journey has come to a fitting and bittersweet conclusion.

The Morning After: Aug. 5, 2019

Welcome to The Morning After, where I share with you what movies I’ve seen over the past week. Below, you will find short reviews of those movies along with a star rating. Full length reviews may come at a later date.

So, here is what I watched this past week:

Spider-Man: Far from Home


We are peak superhero saturation and while many of these films have been quite entertaining, the number of high quality entries continues to decline as the formula of how to make a movie becomes overused. Spider-Man: Far from home, for all of its entertaining elements, is the kind of film that exemplifies the issue of the genre rather than recasts them as something more.

The story follows after the events of Avengers: Endgame and spoils everything about that film, so if you haven’t seen it, don’t touch this one until then. After getting its world-setting out of the way, we find Peter Parker (Tom Holland) wanting to live a normal life in spite of his super powers, including dating MJ (Zendaya) and traveling to Europe for a school outing. While in Venice, the young Spider-Man finds himself confronted with his own misgivings as a new hero, Mysterio (Jake Gyllenhaal), arrives to save the city from a major calamitous event.

Marvel has finally gotten itself to the point where it can laugh and provide a good time for the audience. And although this is a film produced by Sony, the script appears to have been run by Disney for approval first, thus removing anything even remotely creative or original. Then again, there might not have been anything like that in the first draft.

The effects in this film are spectacular and there are a ton of incredibly funny moments. Yet, the similarity between this film and the myriad others of the MCU showcases the limitations of the genre and how it desperately needs to find new ways to be creative. Apart from Black Panther and Thor: Ragnarok, the franchise has been treading water. While they remain incredibly popular, the gentle slide in quality will eventually damage the MCU and Disney will have no one to blame but themselves.

The Morning After: Jun. 10, 2019

Welcome to The Morning After, where I share with you what movies I’ve seen over the past week. Below, you will find short reviews of those movies along with a star rating. Full length reviews may come at a later date.

So, here is what I watched this past week:

Dark Phoenix


With Disney now fully in control of the entirety of Fox’s film division, the X-Men universe is in their control and, as such, Dark Phoenix represents the last film of the Fox era. While the film sets itself up with the possibility of continuation, the affable cast are likely at an end with these characters. James McAvoy, Michael Fassbender, Jennifer Lawrence, Nicholas Hoult, Sophie Turner, Alexnadra Shipp, Tye Sheridan, Kodi Smit-McPhee, and Evan Peters have managed to give us terrific final performances as the X-Men in a film that, while imperfect, is the most entertaining entry in the series since Days of Future Past.

Set in 1992, Dark Phoenix sees the X-Men as celebrated among the non-mutant population of earth, saviors who have done much to improve their standing in society. During a successful mission to rescue the astronauts aboard the Endeavor as they were able to be destroyed by a mysterious space entity, Jean Grey (Turner) absorbs the energy and her already formidable powers are amplified and the walls in her mind erected by Charles Xavier (McAvoy) have begun to crumble. As Jean loses focus on family and friends through a sense of intense betrayal and her inability to control the force within her, the careful walls Xavier has built between the X-Men and society begin to crumble and with them, the safety of the X-Men themselves is at stake from both within and without.

Although Patrick Stewart and Ian McKellen were the best incarnations of Xavier and Eric Lehnsherr/Magneto, McAvoy and Fassbender gave them their own unique talents and while they are modest shadows of the characters they created in Days of Future Past and First Class, they still provide strong characterizations. Lawrence, given very little screen time in this outing, does well with what she has. Hoult, Shipp, Sheridan, Smit-McPhee, and Peters are equally engaging, though perhaps not given enough material. What they are given, however, is the confidence in their abilities that enable them to produce the kind of power displays that are perfect embodiments of their characters.

Apocalypse was the nadir of the X-Men universe, although the Wolverine films were on the whole inferior with only Logan topping much of what came before it, Dark Phoenix is a step above all but the first two films in the series and ranks third among the recent four X-Men outings. It’s too bad these characters aren’t going to be given more chances to expand. I’m afraid Disney’s tinkering might have been a detriment to the film’s overall potential success. We may never know if the rumors of disastrous showings were true or if this was their attempt to ingratiate with X-Men fans for the eventual assimilation into the Marvel Cinematic Universe, which without the X-Men might never have been thought possible and to which they owe a great deal of gratitude even if they should never acknowledge or grant it.

The Morning After: Mar. 18, 2019

Welcome to The Morning After, where I share with you what movies I’ve seen over the past week. Below, you will find short reviews of those movies along with a star rating. Full length reviews may come at a later date.

So, here is what I watched this past week:

Captain Marvel


Set in 1995, Captain Marvel finds Kree operative Vers (Brie Larson) attempting to understand the dreams she’s having that place her in a strange body facing off against a Kree assassin. After being captured by a group of Skrull mercenaries, Vers begins to unravel the flashes of memory she’s had by traveling to Earth where she hopes to uncover information about the Pegasus program with the help of S.H.I.E.L.D. operative Nick Fury (Samuel L. Jackson).

The film, positioned well before current events, establishes Captain Marvel as a character whose power could be crucial in the fight against the events of Avengers: Infinity War. Learning more about this character in this origin story gives the audience a better understanding of who this character is and what she stands for. A potent feminist narrative, Captain Marvel is a tightly written, twist-heavy adventure that also lets us get to know a younger Fury and gives us a brief glimpse of an even younger Agent Coulson (Clark Gregg).

The effects are abundant and the narrative fresh. What’s most entertaining about this film is its constant references to things that are so 1990s, such as Blockbuster, Radio Shack, and dial-up internet. It’s a fascinating time capsule of an era fewer and fewer Marvel fans will be able to connect with. Throw in terrific bits featuring the semi-affectionate cat Goose and you have a film that’s more enjoyable than it is frustrating, which best describes how formulaic the film is. Unlike Black Panther last year, this Marvel Cinematic Universe “first” doesn’t have a freshness of setting or narrative throughline. It’s a film that very much sits in the pedestrian center of the Marvel universe even if it does far better at it than some other films. Larson is a terrific lead and I will be excited to see how her involvement in the franchise plays out over the next few years.

The Morning After: Feb. 11, 2019

Welcome to The Morning After, where I share with you what movies I’ve seen over the past week. Below, you will find short reviews of those movies along with a star rating. Full length reviews may come at a later date.

So, here is what I watched this past week:

First Man


A crisp, technically proficient telling of the American moon landing that ignited a generation’s imagination and propelled U.S. scientific advancements for the following decades. First Man is Damien Chazelle’s follow-up to La La Land, the multiple Oscar-winning musical that now famously lost to Moonlight in Best Picture.

La La Land star Ryan Gosling takes the role of American icon Neil Armstrong who plays the role as a stoic father whose history of loss leads to his emotional detachment, a brave interpretation that won’t come across nearly as sympathetic as some audiences would want, but which feels fitting for the situation. As his put-upon wife, Claire Foy gets little material to work with, but makes the most of it. She has a pair of potent scenes, but otherwise melts into the background giving the film the ability to focus not entirely on Armstrong’s home life, but on the mission itself.

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The Morning After: Feb. 4, 2019

Welcome to The Morning After, where I share with you what movies I’ve seen over the past week. Below, you will find short reviews of those movies along with a star rating. Full length reviews may come at a later date.

So, here is what I watched this past week:

Vice


Director Adam McKay seems to have found a cinematic niche that needed filling. The political satire subgenre has been uninteresting or unabsent for years. With his follow up to The Big Short, McKay has proven adept at giving the world a fascinating, if somewhat bleak look at the various issues that face modern American politics.

Exploring the influence of former Vice President Dick Cheney from his days as a congressional intern to his hollowing out and eroding of the United States government, Vice walks a delicate line between honest portrayal of an odious man and convincing biopic that attempts to partially humanize someone whose vileness has created a dangerous precedent.

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The Morning After: Jan. 28, 2019

Welcome to The Morning After, where I share with you what movies I’ve seen over the past week. Below, you will find short reviews of those movies along with a star rating. Full length reviews may come at a later date.

So, here is what I watched this past week:

Mary Queen of Scots


Mary, Queen of Scots, has been a popular figure in cinema for decades. This latest version of the story stars Saoirse Ronan as the eponymous queen as she returns to Scotland following the death of her French husband to rebuild her claim to the throne of Scotland and England.

Margot Robbie takes on the role of her rival, Queen Elizabeth, as the pair strike a tentative peace while the men around them plot, manipulate, and connive to thwart Mary’s claim to the throne of England. Told almost entirely from the perspective of Mary, giving Ronan a chance to shine as the headstrong queen, we’re given an in-depth look at the political and religious climate of the period as Catholic Mary finds enemies within the Protestant church, led by the firebrand John Knox (David Tenant) while her own half-brother, the Earl of Moray (James McArdle), works behind the scenes to undermine her legitimacy.

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The Morning After: Jan. 2, 2019

Welcome to The Morning After, where I share with you what movies I’ve seen over the past week. Below, you will find short reviews of those movies along with a star rating. Full length reviews may come at a later date.

So, here is what I watched this past week:

Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald


With the promise of presenting a history of the wizarding world of Harry Potter by exploring the events that lead to the downfall of Voldemort’s villainous predecessor, J.K. Rowling and Warner Bros. have done an incredible amount of world building with Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald providing plenty of new background information, new characters, and new plotlines that are sure to fill the remaining three films in the pentalogy.

Not much was known about Newt Scamander (Eddie Redmayne) before this new series of films except that he was well known for writing the definitive book on mystical creatures called Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them. That title became that of the first film with the Fantastic Beasts name carrying forward to the remaining features. This second film moves the action out of New York City and into the magical streets of Paris where Newt and company are trying to find Credence Barebone before Grindelwald can get his clutches on him. As the film unfolds, Newt and his muggle companion Jacob Kowalski (Dan Fogler) set off to Paris to find their respective paramours, sisters Tina (Katherine Waterston) and Queenie (Alison Sudol) Goldstein respectively, and potentially thwart Grindelwald’s schemes while on their quest.

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The Morning After: Dec. 26, 2018

Welcome to The Morning After, where I share with you what movies I’ve seen over the past week. Below, you will find short reviews of those movies along with a star rating. Full length reviews may come at a later date.

So, here is what I watched this past week:

BlacKkKlansman


Long a voice for black America at the cinema, Spike Lee delivers his finest film in several years in the form of BlacKkKlansman, a potent look at the Ku Klux Klan and the hate bubbling under the fabric of American civilization.

Based on the true story of a black police officer in Colorado Springs, Colorado who went undercover as a member of the Ku Klux Klan in order to keep tabs on the insidious organization from the inside. John David Washington stars as Ron Stallworth as the black cop and Adam Driver plays the white cop who does the actual undercover work. Laura Harrier, Topher Grace, Jasper Pääkkönen, Ryan Eggold, Paul Walter Hauser, and Ashlie Atkinson co-star.

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The Morning After: Dec. 17, 2018

Welcome to The Morning After, where I share with you what movies I’ve seen over the past week. Below, you will find short reviews of those movies along with a star rating. Full length reviews may come at a later date.

So, here is what I watched this past week:

If Beale Street Could Talk


Many filmmakers over the years have explored the human condition, but few have given the black community the same attention to passion and detail as Barry Jenkins has in his second feature directorial effort If Beale Street Could Talk.

Based on the James Baldwin novel, the street in question is in Memphis, Tennessee, but the story takes place in Harlem where two young lovers (Tish and Fonny) struggle against the racial injustice of the era as she (KiKi Layne) discovers she’s pregnant after he (Stephan James) has been falsely accused of rape and is awaiting trial.

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The Morning After: Dec. 10, 2018

Welcome to The Morning After, where I share with you what movies I’ve seen over the past week. Below, you will find short reviews of those movies along with a star rating. Full length reviews may come at a later date.

So, here is what I watched this past week:

The Favourite


My first exposure to director Yorgos Lanthimos was his futuristic satire The Lobster starring Rachel Weisz and Colin Farrell. That film was certainly bizarre, but showed a great flavor for the unusual, making him a director to look out for each time he releases a film.

The Favourite has a lot of Lanthimos’ trademark quirkiness, but it’s a more straight forward period drama than what he’s done previously. Olivia Colman plays Queen Anne, an 18th century English monarch whose short rein was filled with the kind of pablum that doesn’t often make great movies. Except this one, which centers around the relationship of Sarah Churchill, Duchess of Marlborough (Rachel Weisz) and her cousin Abigail Hill (Emma Stone) as she seeks a job after her family financial collapse. As Abigail weeds her way into Anne’s life, Sarah plays her political hand too strongly, risking her royal friendship and allowing Abigail an opening.

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The Morning After: Nov. 24, 2018

Welcome to The Morning After, where I share with you what movies I’ve seen over the past week. Below, you will find short reviews of those movies along with a star rating. Full length reviews may come at a later date.

So, here is what I watched this past week:

Suspiria


In horror history, there are a handful of films that can lay claim to being massively influential and a handful that elevated the medium to the level of art. Dario Argento’s 1977 masterpiece Suspiria was one of the latter. Going into the 2018 version of the film of the same name is fraught with peril. Can it compare? Should it compare? Knowing the intention behind the director’s vision is as important to that assessment as is knowing the original.

Luca Guadagnino’s vision for the film was not to remake, but reimagine it for a different audience. While the sequel is still set in an all-girls dance studio with a mysterious faculty, the visual similarities between the two films are diametrically opposed. Whereas Argento’s film is awash in bright, vivid colors, especially reds, Guadagnino’s version avoids primary colors, instead focusing on the drear whites, grays, and blacks of a bleak German winter. While Argento’s film focused almost entirely on the young girl (Jessica Harper) at the center of the story, Gudagnino’s project expands beyond the girl’s (Dakota Johnson) adventures. Both films feature unique and compelling musical scores with hints of the original Goblin score infusing composer Thom Yorke’s rendition.

Suspiria is just as haunting in its new incarnation as it was in the original and both films can exist independently of one another. The new version wants to be a bit headier in its narrative development, tackling motherhood, self-recrimination, and a number of other minor themes. It also expands the exploration of character to other characters, giving meaty roles to a number of prominent actresses, all of whom are an international bevy of talents. Johnson’s character, Susie Bannion, doesn’t have a lot of emotional growth. She reacts to everything going on around her with a sort of emotional detachment. Her visceral reactions are instead foisted on the young women around her, including a superb Mia Goth as her best friend at the school. Tilda Swinton delivers another characteristically brilliant performance as both the imperious teacher at the center of Susie’s growth as well as the father figure Dr. Klemperer, the psychologist trying to get to the bottom of the activities within the school.

The Morning After: Nov. 19, 2018

Welcome to The Morning After, where I share with you what movies I’ve seen over the past week. Below, you will find short reviews of those movies along with a star rating. Full length reviews may come at a later date.

So, here is what I watched this past week:

Hereditary


After a seven-year career as a short filmmaker, Ari Aster has made the transition to features with this chilling and unexpected horror gem. As a mother deals with grief over the death of her mother, her family must struggle with her increasing paranoia.

The film is broken into three incredibly distinct acts. The first act ends with an entirely unexpected twist that redefines the second third of the film, then swerves even further off course in the last third. Each of these course corrections is expertly handled, driving the audience crazy with anticipation for what bizarre thing will happen next and how to connect everything together once the credits role.

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