Category: Academy Awards

This Day in Oscar History: June 25 (2022)

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Oscar in Box Office History (Week 25, 2022)

Every week, we’ll take a look back in 5-year intervals at the box office past to explore how Oscar’s nominees were doing at the box office each weekend historically. The first section under each year is the positioning of all Oscar nominees during that weekend at the box office (as well as a section looking at the inflation-adjusted numbers). The third section is an alphabetical list of those films and the categories in which they were nominated. And to start each week off, we’ll be looking at the films releasing over the weekend that have the best chance of getting Oscar nominations and specifying the categories where we think they have the best shots at this stage of the game. If you have any suggestions for more data you’d like to see, please let us know.

This Year: Potential Oscar Nominees Releasing This Weekend

Elvis (Wide)

Oscar Potential: Picture, Directing, Actor (Austin Butler), Supporting Actor (Tom Hanks), Original Screenplay, Original Score, Film Editing, Cinematography, Production Design, Costume Design, Makeup & Hairstyling, Sound.

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This Day in Oscar History: June 24 (2022)

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Oscar Profile #604: Oscar’s Tenth Decade (2018-2021)

Peter Farrelly’s Green Book won Best Picture of 2018 over Best Director Alfonso Cuaron’s Roma, kicking off the decade. Among the other six nominees were Ryan Coogler’s Black Panther and Spike Lee’s BlacKkKlansman. Not nominated were such films as Damien Chazelle’s First Man and Paul Schrader’s First Reformed.

2019’s Best Picture award went for the first time to a foreign language film, Best Director Bong Joon Ho’s Parasite which also took home the award for Best Foreign Language Film. Among the nine nominees were Sam Mendes’ 1917 and Martin Scorsese’s The Irishman but not Fernando Meirelles’ The Two Popes or Robert Eggers’ The Lighthouse.

Oscar’s 2020 Best Picture and Director Oscars went to Chloé Zhao’s Nomadland in an eight-film race over such films as Lee Isaac Chung’s Minari and Darius Marder’s Sound of Metal. Among the films not nominated were Regina King’s One Night in Miami… and Kevin Macdonald’s The Mauritanian during the Covid-19 pandemic in which the eligibility period was extended through February 2021.

For 2021’s shortened ten-month eligibility period, Oscar gave its Best Picture award to Sian Heder’s crowd-pleasing CODA while giving its Best Director award to Jane Campion’s vastly superior The The Power of the Dog. Included among the ten nominees were Kenneth Branagh’s Belfast and Ryusuki Hamaguchi’s Drive My Car. Among those not nominated were Fran Kranz’s Mass and Rebecca Hall’s Passing.

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This Day in Oscar History: June 23 (2022)

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This Day in Oscar History: June 22 (2022)

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95th Oscars: Honorary Oscar Recipients Announced

THE ACADEMY TO HONOR MICHAEL J. FOX, EUZHAN PALCY, DIANE WARREN AND PETER WEIR WITH OSCARS® AT GOVERNORS AWARDS IN NOVEMBER

LOS ANGELES, CA – The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences announced today that its Board of Governors voted to present Honorary Awards to Euzhan Palcy, Diane Warren and Peter Weir, and the Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award to Michael J. Fox. The four Oscar® statuettes will be presented at the Academy’s 13th Governors Awards on Saturday, November 19, 2022, in Los Angeles.

“The Academy’s Board of Governors is honored to recognize four individuals who have made indelible contributions to cinema and the world at large,” said Academy President David Rubin. “Michael J. Fox’s tireless advocacy of research on Parkinson’s disease alongside his boundless optimism exemplifies the impact of one person in changing the future for millions. Euzhan Palcy is a pioneering filmmaker whose groundbreaking significance in international cinema is cemented in film history. Diane Warren’s music and lyrics have magnified the emotional impact of countless motion pictures and inspired generations of musical artists. Peter Weir is a director of consummate skill and artistry whose work reminds us of the power of film to reveal the full range of human experience.”

Fox gained fame playing Alex P. Keaton on the sitcom “Family Ties.” His hit films include “Back to the Future,” “The Secret of My Success,” “Casualties of War,” “Doc Hollywood” and “The American President.” He returned to television in his award-winning lead role on “Spin City,” followed by guest appearances in series including “Rescue Me,” “The Good Wife” and “Curb Your Enthusiasm.” His many awards include five Emmys, four Golden Globes, one Grammy, two Screen Actors Guild awards, a People’s Choice award, and GQ Man of the Year. In 2000, he launched the Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson’s Research, which is now the leading Parkinson’s organization in the world. He is the author of four New York Times bestselling books: Lucky Man, Always Looking Up, A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Future and No Time Like the Future: An Optimist Considers Mortality. Fox is the subject of a documentary from Oscar-winning filmmaker Davis Guggenheim, which is currently in production.

Palcy is a writer, director and producer born in Martinique in the French West Indies. Her first feature film, “Sugar Cane Alley,” won the Silver Lion at the 1983 Venice Film Festival, a first for a Black director. It went on to win a César Award for Best First Work, the first César won by a woman director and by a Black filmmaker. She continued her journey with “A Dry White Season” (1989), a drama made at the height of apartheid, becoming the first Black woman to direct a film for a major Hollywood studio and guiding Marlon Brando to his last Oscar nomination. Her films also include the musical fairytale “Siméon.” Palcy’s work has been an inspiration to filmmakers, contemporary artists and novelists.

Warren is one of the most prolific contemporary songwriters and has written original songs for more than 100 films. She has earned 13 Oscar nominations in the Original Song category, starting in 1987 and within each of the past five decades, for songs including “Nothing’s Gonna Stop Us Now,” “Because You Loved Me,” “How Do I Live,” “I Don’t Want To Miss A Thing,” “Til It Happens To You” and “Stand Up for Something.” She has collaborated with such prominent music artists as Beyoncé, Cher, Celine Dion, Whitney Houston, Jennifer Hudson, Lady Gaga, John Legend, Reba McEntire and Carlos Santana.

A leading figure in the Australian New Wave film movement in the 1970s, Weir emerged as a visionary filmmaker with “Picnic at Hanging Rock” and “The Last Wave.” He earned Oscar nominations for Directing for “Witness,” “Dead Poets Society,” “The Truman Show” and “Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World,” for which he also received a Best Picture nomination, and earned a Writing nomination for “Green Card.” His other notable films include “The Way Back,” “Fearless,” “The Mosquito Coast,” “The Year of Living Dangerously” and “Gallipoli.”

The Honorary Award, an Oscar statuette, is given “to honor extraordinary distinction in lifetime achievement, exceptional contributions to the state of motion picture arts and sciences, or for outstanding service to the Academy.”

The Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award, also an Oscar statuette, is given “to an individual in the motion picture arts and sciences whose humanitarian efforts have brought credit to the industry.”

The 13th Governors Awards is proudly supported by Rolex, the Exclusive Watch of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.

This Day in Oscar History: June 21 (2022)

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Oscar Preview: Weekend of Jun. 17-19, 2022

We had one films release this past weekend with the potential for Oscar nominations.

Lightyear

The latest Disney/Pixar animated release came out this weekend and it was a box office weakling. Further, its IMDb rating is currently a dismal 5.3. That’s the lowest a Pixar film has ever scored. Even The Good Dinosaur and Cars 2 did better with audiences. That number may increase over time as more people see the film, but it’s clearly not the best result Disney could have asked for, especially on a tentpole film like this. The film scored a decent, though not outstanding 7.3 on Rotten Tomatoes and a 61 at MetaCritic. On Rotten Tomatoes, the audience score is a more robust 86%. On Rotten Tomatoes, the film is ranked higher than all the Cars films, but is tied with The Good Dinosaur. On MetaCritic, the audience results are anemic with only a 4.4 rating. They don’t have an easy way to search for all Pixar films, though.

Having said all that, it seems very much that this is one of Pixar’s weakest films in several years. And while it seems original in terms of its style, it’s undoubtedly a prequel, which will inhibit its chances at the Oscars. While new and inventive Pixar titles almost always get nominated at the Oscars, The Good Dinosaur being a major exception, they are not so gracious to prequels and sequels. Matter of fact, non-Pixar/Disney prequels/sequels do better with the Academy than do actual Pixar/Disney ones. That hasn’t hindered the Toy Story sequels, which have always been nominated, but it looks like this film’s weakness could end that streak. Even if it is not an Animated Feature nominee, it could have a chance in Original Score, Adapted Screenplay, and Sound as those are the few categories where animated films have secured nominations before. Since the film is doing poorly with audiences and is satisfactory only with critics, Adapted Screenplay will be out. Sound is not Sound Effects, which is the category Pixar had done well in before and Original Score remains the film’s best pick-up opportunity, but that seems unlikely at this juncture.

This Day in Oscar History: June 20 (2022)

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This Day in Oscar History: June 19 (2022)

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This Day in Oscar History: June 18 (2022)

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Oscar in Box Office History (Week 24, 2022)

Every week, we’ll take a look back in 5-year intervals at the box office past to explore how Oscar’s nominees were doing at the box office each weekend historically. The first section under each year is the positioning of all Oscar nominees during that weekend at the box office (as well as a section looking at the inflation-adjusted numbers). The third section is an alphabetical list of those films and the categories in which they were nominated. And to start each week off, we’ll be looking at the films releasing over the weekend that have the best chance of getting Oscar nominations and specifying the categories where we think they have the best shots at this stage of the game. If you have any suggestions for more data you’d like to see, please let us know.

This Year: Potential Oscar Nominees Releasing This Weekend

Lightyear (Wide)

Oscar Potential: Animated Feature, Original Score, Sound, Visual Effects.

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This Day in Oscar History: June 17 (2022)

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Oscar Profile #603: Oscar’s Ninth Decade (2008-2017)

Best Director Danny Boyle’s Slumdog Millionaire won Best Picture of 2008 as Oscar ended its 65-year tradition of five nominees in the category. It won over David Fincher’s The Curious Case of Benjamin Button, Ron Howard’s Frost/Nixon, Gus Van Sant’s Milk, and Stephen Daldry’s The Reader. Not nominated were such films as John Patrick Shanley’s Doubt, Christopher Nolan’s The Dark Knight, and Darren Aronofsky’s The Wrestler.

For the first time since 1944, 2009’s Oscar’s Best Picture slate extended beyond five films. Despite ten nominees, the race was considered to be between just two films, Kathryn Bigelow’s The Hurt Locker which won Best Picture and director over her former husband James Cameron’s Avatar. The extended list of nominees included Quentin Tarantino’s Inglorious Basterdsand Jason Reitman’s Up in the Air but not Michael Haneke’s The White Ribbon or Jim Sheridan’s Brothers.

Oscar’s 2010 Best Picture and Director Oscars went to Tom Hooper’s The King’s Speech in a close race with David Fincher’s The Social Network. Included among the ten nominees were David O. Russell’s The Fighter and Lisa Cholodenko’s The Kids Are All Right but not Mark Romanek’s Never Let Me Go or Matt Reeves’ Let Me In.

For 2011, Oscar gave its Best picture and Director awards to Michel Hazanavicius’ The Artist over Martin Scorsese’s Hugo. Included among the nine nominees were Steven Spielberg’s War Horse and Stephen Daldry’s Extremely Loud & Incredibly Clear but not Asghar Farhadi’s A Separation or Xavier Beauvois’ Of Gods and Men.

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