Poll: Remaking Best Adapted Screenplay, 2004

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Remaking Best Adapted Screenplay, 2004

In our twelfth pass of the Oscar nominees from 1997 through 2016, we take a look at the nominees for Best Adapted Screenplay. Each week, we’ll present a list of contenders from which you can select five to make up the Best Adapted Screenplay slate. There will be an “Other” option, but you can only use this once and you’ll have to specify your other in the comments. Now on to the game: Best Adapted Screenplay.

Cinema Sight Asks: Which Hopefuls Should Have Been Nominated for Best Adapted Screenplay (select up to 5)?

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Film Preview: Riders of Justice (2021)

Film Poster

Page Revisions:

(May 2, 2021) Original

Release Date:

May 21, 2021

Synopsis:

From IMDb: “Markus, who has to go home to his teenage daughter, Mathilde, when his wife dies in a tragic train accident. It seems like an accident until a mathematics geek, who was also a fellow passenger on the train, and his two colleagues show up.”

Poster Rating: C- / C / C-

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Review: (#1) A dingy, unappealing design that tells the audience that this is about bikers, which it is not. That kind of misleading aesthetic won’t win the film fans. (#2) This design may suggest the film’s a comedy, but that isn’t well reflected in the trailer, plus the stagy nature of the image balance doesn’t make it terribly appealing. (#3) The best representation of the film’s trailer, this design is woefully structured, meant to look like the interior of the car, but definitely showing its cut-out elements.

Trailer Rating: C+

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Review: A failure to generate the kind of comedic elements that might make this Danish film look more appealing might ultimately keep audiences from connecting with it.

Oscar Prospects:

None.

Trailer #1

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Film Preview: Those Who Wish Me Dead (2021)

Film Poster

Page Revisions:

(May 2, 2021) Original

Release Date:

May 14, 2021

Synopsis:

From IMDb: “A teenage murder witness finds himself pursued by twin assassins in the Montana wilderness with a survival expert tasked with protecting him — and a forest fire threatening to consume them all.”

Poster Rating: C- / B-

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Review: (#1) There’s not a lot here except a supposedly terrified Angelina Jolie and a crying child. The red and yellow lighting doesn’t sufficiently tell the audience what’s going on. (#2) If you want to give the audience an idea of what they are going to see, this is the design you want to put forth. The background/midground/foreground details set the place and narrative while the character images help create a sense of humanity.

Trailer Rating: C+

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Review: A surprisingly fresh concept is presented in a stale trailer package that has to hit all of the expected notes making the whole film feel like a series of checked boxes rather than a convincing narrative.

Oscar Prospects:

It’s not the kind of film Academy voters typically embrace, but Angelina Jolie could be a left-field contender for Best Actress and films that feature fires this massive tend to compete in the Best Sound category, though competition this year will surely be fierce between blockbusters.

Trailer #1

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5 Favorites Redux #78: Favorites: Garfield, Haddish, Molina, Oyelowo, Statham

Welcome to 5 Favorites. Each week, I will put together a list of my 5 favorites (films, performances, whatever strikes my fancy) along with commentary on a given topic each week, usually in relation to a specific film releasing that week.

A wide array of new movies releases this weekend and it’s impossible to pick just one actor to highlight, so I picked five. I ultimately bypassed two names. The first was Billy Crystal whose new comedy, Here Today, co-stars Tiffany Haddish, whom I did include below. I struggled to find an adequate film to represent Crystal that I would say I enjoyed more than these other films. The other I thought about including was Rosario Dawson, who features in this week’s The Water Man, but for similar reasons to Crystal, I couldn’t choose a film that I ultimately cared for more than the below.

Now to the five actors I ultimately selected. Alongside Dawson, The Water Man features David Oyelowo and Alfred Molina. Haddish, as mentioned above, is in Here Today while Andrew Garfield is front and center in this week’s Mainstream. Finally, there’s Jason Statham, an actor whom I generally cannot stand, and his new film Wrath of Man looks like more of the same, but who did deliver one performance that finally made me appreciate him…but only that one time. Now, to the five films that I chose to represent Garfield, Haddish, Molina, Oyelowo, and Statham.

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Oscar Profile #547: Frances McDormand Revisited

Born June 23, 1957 in Chicago, Illinois, Frances McDormand was the adopted daughter of Canadian-born parents, Noreen Eloise (Nickleson), a nurse from Ontario, and The Rev. Vernon Weir McDormand, a Disciples of Christ minister from Nova Scotia, who raised her in the suburbs of Pittsburgh. She began her stage career after graduating from Yale in 1982, appearing on Broadway in the 1984 revival of Awake and Sing!, the same year she made her film debut in Blood Simple, marrying the film’s director, Joel Coen.

In 1987 she played another supporting role in one of her husband’s films, Raising Arizona, in which the female lead was played by her college roommate, Holly Hunter. The following year, McDormand received a Tony nomination for playing Stella in a revival of A Streetcar Named Desire and an Oscar nomination for her portrayal of the wife of a racist deputy sheriff in Mississippi Burning.

Despite her Oscar nomination, McDormand languished in minor, often unbilled roles, until her iconic portrayal of the pregnant sheriff in Coen’s 1996 masterwork, Fargo, which brought her numerous awards including an Oscar for Best Actress. She also had important roles in that year’s Primal Fear and Lone Star. Despite the Oscar, however, it was back to supporting roles in films, two of which in 2000, brought her further awards recognition. She was recognized by various critics’ groups for her work in both Wonder Boys and Almost Famous, the latter bringing her a third Oscar nomination, her second in support.

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This Day in Oscar History: May 6 (2021)

Here’s what happened today in Oscar History.

Born

Died

Released

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Poll: What Are You Watching? (May 7-9, 2021)

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What Are You Watching? (May 7-9, 2021)

Cinema Sight Asks: What are you watching? (May 7-9, 2021)

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Trailer Watch: Peter Rabbit 2: The Runaway (2021) Updated

Peter Rabbit 2: The Runaway posterNew Trailer (#3) — New Posters (#2-#7) — New Release Date (changed from 4/3/20) — Updated Plot Description

Peter Rabbit 2: The Runaway, updated

Preview Link: CLICK HERE for all of the new content as well as the original.

Trailer Watch: In the Heights (2021) Updated

In the Heights posterNew Trailer (#4)

In the Heights, updated

Preview Link: CLICK HERE for all of the new content as well as the original.

Looking at the Weekend: May 7-9, 2021

With a disappointing couple of weeks at the box office, two new films are hoping to change the calculus. Here Today is a comedy from the mind of Billy Crystal and co-starring Tiffany Haddish. Both have decent bases of appreciation, so it could perform well. The same could be said of Guy Ritchie’s new film, Wrath of Man, starring Jason Statham. Historically, Statham’s non-franchise action films tend to do poorly and this looks to be one. The pair of Ritchie and Statham might signify a larger chance of success or it could spell disaster. We’ll see what kinds of films audiences will be willing to make it to the theater for with this week’s performances.

Our Highest Rated Films: Here Today
Our Best Awards Ratings: No consensus

OTHER LIMITED RELEASES

Above Suspicion (Limited)
Duty Free (Limited)
Terrible Child (Limited)
The Human Factor (Limited)
My Love (Limited)
The Paper Tigers (Limited)
Undergods (Limited)
White People Money (Limited)

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Review: The Mirror Has Two Faces (1996)

The Mirror Has Two Faces

The Mirror Has Two Faces

Rating



Director

Barbra Streisand

Screenplay

Richard LaGravanese (Screenplay: Andre Cayatte, Gerard Oury)

Length

2h 6m

Starring

Barbra Streisand, Jeff Bridges, Lauren Bacall, George Segal, Mimi Rogers, Pierce Brosnan, Brenda Vaccaro Austin Pendleton, Elle Macpherson

MPAA Rating

PG-13
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This Day in Oscar History: May 5 (2021)

Here’s what happened today in Oscar History.

Born

Died

Released

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Trailer Watch: Luca (2021) Updated

Luca posterNew Trailer (#2) — New Posters (#2-#3)

Luca, updated

Preview Link: CLICK HERE for all of the new content as well as the original.

Film Preview: New Order (2021)

Film Poster

Page Revisions:

(May 2, 2021) Original

Release Date:

May 21, 2021

Synopsis:

From IMDb: “A lavish high-society wedding unexpectedly turns into a class struggle that leads to a violent coup.”

Poster Rating: C / C / C-

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Review: (#1) The green that was so prominent in the trailer without sufficient explanation is also a part of this poster design, which only creates chaos without justification. (#2) A little more balance in this design, but it’s also a bit more staid with some interesting hues impeding on the image. (#3) The subtlety of the prior designs is gone and the end result is something too chaotic and inexplicable.

Trailer Rating: B-

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Review: A chaotic trailer can create a lot of confusion with this non-English language trailer struggling to keep the audience on board with its premise, which must be painfully cobbled together from ill-fitting elements throughout.

Oscar Prospects:

None.

Trailer #1

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The DVD Report #723

Nomadland is the first film since 12 Years a Slave to win the Satellite, Golden Globe – Drama, Critics Choice, BAFTA, Independent Spirit, and Oscar awards for Best Picture. The film version of Jessica Bruder’s non-fiction book won just three Oscars but all three were historic ones. Chloé Zhao became the second woman and first Asian woman to win Best Directing. Frances McDormand became the first actress since Katharine Hepburn to win three lead Oscars and the first actress since Hepburn to win a total of four overall. McDormand and Zhao, as producers of the film, also shared its Best Picture win.

Released on Blu-ray and standard DVD by Disney, now the parent company of Searchlight (formerly Fox Searchlight), the film looks stunning. McDormand is simply superb as the dispossessed woman creating a new life for herself as a nomad. The actress spent more than four months driving a van she slept in across seven states. Many of the people she met along the way had no idea she was an actress. They thought she was the woman she was pretending to be.

Except for veteran actor, David Strathairn, who plays a fellow nomad, all the other actors were real-life nomads either playing themselves or variations of themselves.

The film had also been nominated for Oscars for Best Adapted Screenplay (Zhao), Film Editing (again, Zhao), and Cinematography (Joshua James Richards).

Nomadland is the second of this year’s Best Picture Oscar nominees to be released on DVD and Blu-ray. It was preceded by Promising Young Woman and is to be followed by Judas and the Black Messiah this week with Minari and The Father due two weeks hence. Sound of Metal is due later in the year. The Trial of the Chicago 7 and Mank have not been announced.

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