This Day in Oscar History: July 4 (2020)

Here’s what happened today in Oscar History.

Born

Died

Released

Our Site Milestones

2011: Polls: What Are You Watching? (9)

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Film Preview: Hamilton (2020)

Page Revisions:

(June 28, 2020) Original

Release Date:

July 3, 2020

Synopsis:

From IMDb: “The real life of one of America’s foremost founding fathers and first Secretary of the Treasury, Alexander Hamilton. Filmed live on Broadway from the Richard Rodgers Theatre with the original Broadway cast.”

Poster Rating: C / C (10)

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Review: (#1-#11) All of these designs are based off the same concept. With the original Broadway design (#1) acting as a template for the remaining “character” posters, which don’t quite sell the individuals, just an element of them.

Trailer Rating: C+

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Review: I suppose if you’ve already seen the show, this might be a bit more exciting than if you haven’t. There’s not enough of the music to give the audience a push to watch the film, especially compared to the far better In the Heights trailer, also from Lin-Manuel Miranda.

Oscar Prospects:

None.

Trailer #1

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Oscar in Box Office History (Week 27, 2020)

Every week, we’ll take a look back in 5-year intervals at the box office past to explore how Oscar’s nominees were doing at the box office each weekend historically. The first section under each year is the positioning of all Oscar nominees during that weekend at the box office (as well as a section looking at the inflation-adjusted numbers). The third section is an alphabetical list of those films and the categories in which they were nominated. And to start each week off, we’ll be looking at the films releasing over the weekend that have the best chance of getting Oscar nominations and specifying the categories where we think they have the best shots at this stage of the game. If you have any suggestions for more data you’d like to see, please let us know.

This Year: Potential Oscar Nominees Releasing This Weekend

None

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The Friday Face-Off Round Two #11

Below are our face-offs for this week. Choose the better winner in each category. For more information on how the game works, click here.

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This Day in Oscar History: July 3 (2020)

Here’s what happened today in Oscar History.

Born

Died

Released

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Poll: Remaking Best Costume Design, 2000

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Polls

Remaking Best Costume Design, 2000

In our third pass of the Oscar nominees from 1997 through 2016, we take a look at the nominees for Best Costume Design. Each week, we’ll present a list of contenders from which you can select five to make up the Best Costume Design slate. There will be an “Other” option, but you can only use this once and you’ll have to specify your other in the comments. Now on to the game: Best SCostume Design.

Cinema Sight Asks: Which Hopefuls Should Have Been Nominated for Best Costume Design (select up to 5)?

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Film Preview: Ava (2020)

Page Revisions:

(June 28, 2020) Original

Release Date:

September 25, 2020

Synopsis:

From IMDb: “Ava (Chastain) is a deadly assassin who works for a black ops organization, traveling the globe specializing in high profile hits. When a job goes dangerously wrong she is forced to fight for her own survival.”

Poster Rating: C+

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Review: The design is simplistic, but ties into the film adequately.

Trailer Rating: B-

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Review: The action seems dull and unoriginal, the premise is not much more compelling. The cast along is what bolster’s the film’s prospects as there are some amazing talents involved.

Oscar Prospects:

None.

Trailer #1

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5 Favorites Redux #34: Favorite Star Trek: Enterprise Episodes

Welcome to 5 Favorites. Each week, I will put together a list of my 5 favorites (films, performances, whatever strikes my fancy) along with commentary on a given topic each week, usually in relation to a specific film releasing that week.

As I sat down to watch the sixth and final Star Trek series from the filmic-pre-reboot era, I fully expected the show to end up at the bottom of the list and after the mediocre first two seasons, my opinion became fairly certain. Then something changed in the third season. It wasn’t the studio’s forced push to bring more action to the show that finally made it get good, it’s that it shifted writing wise as well. At first, going from the entirely episodic first two seasons to the season-long storyline of the third made for a jolting experience and I was initially hesitant to accept it.

While I ended the third season frustrated with a lot of the showrunners’ decisions, I ultimately felt the show had turned a corner, but the finale of the third season and the first two episodes of the fourth, and final, season gave me pause. It tackled Nazism in more straight-forward terms than any of the prior series. Yet, the episodes felt entirely derivative, which wasn’t a good sign for the show. The first two episodes ended well enough, but again they weren’t as good as I would have wanted. Yet, after that, the series took a much grander, bolder, and more compelling turn, one that helped point towards the ultimate founding of the United Federation of Planets and with numerous multi-part episodes to cap off the series, the end result was decidedly more enticing.

When I first started working on this project, I decided to rate all of the episodes on a four-star scale. No series started off so poorly on an average of these ratings than Enterprise, which didn’t have its first four-star episode until the final episode of season 1. After that, the number of exceptional episodes continued meagerly until Season 4, where just under 50% of the series’ four-star episodes were released. Ultimately, the averages of all of the episodes puts Voyager at the bottom with Enterprise just barely past it in fourth place. That said, in my gut, Voyager was more consistently good than Enterprise was and I would probably swap those places were it based on overall impressions rather than ratings.

In the end, because the final season was shorter than its predecessors and was more jam-packed with well written and compelling narratives, the fourth season of Star Trek: Enterprise averaged out to be the second best season in Trek history, just behind the final season of Star Trek: Deep Space Nine. That might seem surprising, but as we learned with Next Generation, Deep Space Nine, and Voyager, the fourth season is always the season in which the shows finally hit their stride. That Enterprise ended on its fourth season is disappointing, but expected. It was never going to reach the heights that the prior series did, even with the far more well known Scott Bakula (Quantum Leap) in the lead.

Bakula played Capt. Jonathan Archer, the son of a noted ship designer, who is taking the prototype Warp 5 NX-01, named Enterprise, on its maiden voyage. Having been cautiously watched by the Vulcans who let the Humans make all their own mistakes, they assigned a Vulcan science officer, T’Pol (Jolene Blalock) to the ship, who acts as second-in-command to Archer. Other crew members include Archer’s best friend Charles “Trip” Tucker III (Connor Trinneer) as chief engineer, Malcolm Reed (Dominic Keating) as tactical officer, Hoshi Sato (Linda Park) as linguist and communications officer, Travis Mayweather (Anthony Montgomery) as helmsman, and Dr. Phlox (John Billingsley) as the Denobulan chief medical officer who, alongside T’Pol, was the only other non-human onboard.

The series initially focused on the Temporal Cold War, an attempt by time traveling aliens to derail history, specifically by trying to ensure the United Federation of Planets is never founded. This led into the third season story arc that began with the annihilation of a swath of Florida, killing millions of humans, and leading the Enterprise into the Expanse, a strange span of space where large planet-sized structures were adapting that area of space into an inhospitable wasteland for Enterprise and many other species. The Temporal Cold War was poorly handled and was a weak part of the first three seasons. Beyond that, the fourth season involves several events that ultimately lead towards a treaty between two factions the Vulcans and the Andorians, who were perpetually on the brink of war.

With all that out of the way, let’s get into my list. I have once again combined multi-part episodes into one whole. There were a total of nine of these types of episodes across the series’ four seasons, with three of them being three-part episodes and the rest two-part. Strangely, there were no multi-part episodes in the whole of season 3 even though most of the story was continued from one episode to the next. Out of 98 episodes, only 12 earned four stars from me. When combined, there were only nine episodes that would have even qualified for this list. Rather than shoe-horning a tenth episode into this list from the very large number of three-and-a-half-star episodes, I will leave the list as it stands with only nine entries, which will continue after the break.

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Oscar Profile #503: Henry Koster

Born Hermann Kosterlitz on May 1, 1905 in Berlin, Germany, the future Henry Koster was the grandson on his mother’s side of famed operatic tenor Julius Salomon who died of tuberculosis in the 1880s. His father, who was a salesman of women’s underwear, abandoned his family when the future director was 5. His mother got a job playing piano in her brother’s movie theatre in 1910, taking young Koster with her where he developed his fascination with film.

Koster achieved success as a short story writer at 17, which resulted in a Berlin movie company hiring him as a scenarist where he eventually became assistant to director Curtis Bernhardt. He became a director himself in 1931, moving to Budapest, Hungary when Hitler came to power. There he met and married actress Kato Kiraly. There he also met Joe Pasternak, Universal’s representative in Europe, for whom he made four films. In 1936, Universal brought Pasternak, Koster and his wife, and several other refugees to Hollywood where he was given a contract.

Koster’s first Hollywood film was 1936’s Three Smart Girls starring 14-year-old Deanna Durbin, the film that saved Universal from bankruptcy, His second was 1937’s 100 Men and a Girl, also starring Durbin, and also a huge hit. Both films were nominated for Best Picture Oscars. In 1940, he discovered Abbott and Costello doing a nightclub act in New York and brought them to Universal where they became overnight sensations. Divorced from Kiraly in 1941with whom he had one child, he married actress Polly Moran in 1942 with whom he would have two more children.

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This Day in Oscar History: July 2 (2020)

Here’s what happened today in Oscar History.

Our Site Milestones

Born

Died

Released

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Poll: What Are You Watching? (Jul. 3-5, 2020)

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Polls

What Are You Watching? (Jul. 3-5, 2020)

Cinema Sight Asks: What are you watching? (Jul. 3-5, 2020)

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Film Preview: The Nest (2020)

Page Revisions:

(June 28, 2020) Original

Release Date:

September 18, 2020

Synopsis:

From IMDb: “Life for an entrepreneur and his American family begin to take a twisted turn after moving into an English country manor.”

Poster Rating: –


Review: There was no poster immediately available for my review. Should one become available in the future, this section will be updated.

Trailer Rating: B-

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Review: This relationship drama has a solid cast, but the trailer only partly gives the viewer a reason to expect something explosive. It tries very hard to blend the idyllic with the nightmarish, but not exactly with the precise flair it needed to.

Oscar Prospects:

None.

Trailer #1

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Looking at the Weekend: Jul. 3-5, 2020

With the July film landscape continuously changing (all of the impending wide releases have been moved into August), there’s just not much to choose fun. What’s most palpable is the sense of dread having a July 4 holiday weekend, especially with most people getting the Friday before off, vacant of new wide releases.

Our Highest Rated Films: The Truth
Our Best Awards Ratings: None

OTHER LIMITED RELEASES

John Lewis: Good Trouble (Limited)
Denise Ho — Becoming the Song (Virtual)
Elliott Erwitt: Silence Sounds Good (Virtual)

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Review: Pitch Perfect 3 (2017)

Pitch Perfect 2

Rating

Director

Trish Sie

Screenplay

Kay Cannon, Mike White

Length

1h 33min

Starring

Anna Kendrick, Rebel Wilson, Brittany Snow, Anna Camp, Hailee Steinfeld, Ester Dean, Hana Mae Lee, Kelley Jakle, Shelley Regner, Chrissie Fit, Elizabeth Banks, John Michael Higgins, John Lithgow, Matt Lanter, Guy Burnet, Alexis Knapp, DJ Khaled, Troy Ian Hall, Michael Rose, Jessica Chaffin, Moises Arias, Derek Mehn, Ruby Rose, Andy Allo, Venzella Joy Williams, Hannah Fairlight

MPAA Rating

PG-13

Original Preview

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93rd Oscars: Upcoming Precursors – July

Precursors to the Academy Awards come in many different types and they can appear all year from festivals and national awards to critics groups and other organization. Each month, we’ll take a look at all of the upcoming events that could have some small impact on the Oscars so you can plan out what to keep an eye on.

NOTE: We already know the Academy’s calendar has changed dramatically, so that event will not go on as planned, nor has it been rescheduled. The others may also face similar struggles. This is a historical record of what was potentially going to happen had the pandemic not reared its head.

July

Nominations

Thursday, Jul. 23 – Grande Premio do Cinema Brasileiro (Nominations) (Unconfirmed)

Awards

Monday, Jul. 13 – Young Artists Awards (Awards) (Unconfirmed)

Oscars

Wednesday, Jul. 8 – Sci-Tech Awards: Submissions Open (Unconfirmed)
Wednesday, Jul. 29 – Sci-Tech Awards: Submission Deadline (Unconfirmed)